Thursday, 16 February 2017

You could beat rising gas and electricity prices by using renewable heat sources

Turning your home into a mini-power station using renewable heat technologies could help you cut bills and carbon emissions by generating a significant proportion of your heating and hot water needs yourself.  Plus it means you’re less dependent on sources of energy that are increasingly subject to global demand, so you're more protected from future price rises.



The government launched the Renewable Heating Incentive (RHI) to pay households to generate renewable heat through low or zero carbon microgeneration technology.   However, since its launch in 2013, payments have been reduced. You can find out more about the Renewable Heat Incentive here.

You can apply to get payments from your energy supplier if you generate your own electricity using renewable technologies such as solar panels. This is called a ‘feed-in tariff’.  You find out more about this at https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/environmental-programmes/fit

If you're considering installing a microgeneration technology in your home, it’s important to take a long-term view.

Let’s look at the three main renewable technology options available for your home – heat pumps, solar panels and biomass boilers.

 

Ground Source and Air Source Heat Pumps


A ground source heat pump system harnesses natural heat from underground by pumping water through it.   Ground source heat pump systems are made up of a network of water pipes buried underground (generally in a garden) and a heat pump at ground level.

An air source heat pump takes heat from the air and is usually placed outdoors at the side or back of a property. 

In both systems the heat pump increases the temperature, and the heat is used to provide home heating or hot water. They require electricity to work, but should cost less to run than a traditional heating system.

For more information read our guide on Understanding Heat Pumps.

Solar Panels


Solar panels harness the power of sunlight to provide heat and hot water. Solar thermal panels generate heat and solar photovoltaic panels generate electricity and any extra electricity that you generate but don't use will be sent to the National Grid, which you'll get paid for. You will need to consider whether your home is in the best position to harness the power of sunlight.

For more information read our guide on Solar Thermal Hot Water.

Wood-burning Stoves


Wood-burning stoves generate heat meaning that you won't have to turn on your central heating. You can use a stove to heat just one room, such as the room you use most. Alternatively, you can get one installed with a 'back boiler', which means the heat it creates will heat your whole home. If you source discarded wood and dry it out yourself, instead of buying logs especially for your stove, heating your home could cost nothing. But you'll need to be sure you can get a regular supply and that you have room to store wood.

For more information read our guide on Understanding Biomass Appliances.

Sourcing the right installer


You can use APHC’s search facility at www.FindAQualityPlumber.co.uk to find a qualified installer who is registered under the Microgeneration Certification Scheme, which will allow you to claim the financial incentives from the Feed-in Tariff and the Renewable Heat Incentive.

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